Paradise Reef & Victoria’s Secret Reef

Paradise Reef
Schoolmasters and varieties of grunts glide above the fingers of coral that form Paradise Reef. Healthy coral and sponge life grow slowly beneath the swarms of fish who enjoy this site.

Victoria’s Secret Reef
A west side shallow boat dive the top of Victoria’s secret is at 20’ and descends to 50’ amongst the coral fingers. This site sprawls across the ocean floor with jutting pinnacles and narrow valleys concealing arrow crabs and the occasional moray. It’s a less vibrant area than some other west side sites but still makes for an interesting dive.

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Jax Dax & Aquarium

Jax Dax
A dive staffer named Jack was famous for his daiqueiri making skills, so much so this site was changed from Governer’s Beach to its current name. Fields of sand on the site resemble a whack-a-mole game with garden eels poking in and out, but please just observe!

Aquarium
Dive master’s may tell you this site is surrounded by glass walls but don’t be fooled. It is notable for its sea life and less for its coral formations. Turtles, spotted drums, christmas tree worms, and flamingo tongues can be found in abundance.

Sentinel Rock & The Wreck of the USS Kittiwake

Sentinel Rock
A lovely deep pinnacle suited to more advanced divers as the mooring pin here is at 70 feet. Big green moray eels have been spotted at the top of the pinnacle and robust corals and sponge life abounds!

The Wreck of the USS Kittiwake
Commissioned in 1944 and launched into the American Naval Fleet in 1945, the Ex USS Kittiwake was a five deck submarine rescue vessel containing ninety-eight enlisted men with ten officers aboard. Decommissioned in the late seventies, the Kittiwake made its way to the Grand Cayman in January of 2011, to be intentionally sunk.
Within the ship you find ghostly sections like the captain’s quarters, munitions room, mess hall, radio transmission room, propulsion room, and weather center.

Easy Street & Hammerhead Hill Reef

Easy Street
Done as a hundred foot dive many swimthroughs provide a hiding place for invertebrates. Orange elephant ear sponges make a good meal for the hawksbill turtles who frequent the location.

Hammerhead Hole
Rarely will you site a hammerhead here however one long finger hosts numerous mounds of coral with smaller fish life. Purple vase sponges host peterson cleaning shrimp and other even smaller macro life.